Strange Storm

birth-of-super-typhoon-philippines_73294_600x450Photo by NASA/NOAA

Supertyphoon Haiyan: Why Monster Storm Is So Unusual
from the National Geographic by Jane J. Lee

Haiyan is a strange storm in both its strength and because it comes very late in the typhoon season, which officially ended November 1, said Colin Price, head of the geophysical, atmospheric, and planetary sciences department at Tel Aviv University in Israel.

Although the overall number of hurricanes, cyclones, and typhoons—all the same weather phenomenon—hasn’t increased over the past decades, the proportion of more intense storms has, Price explained.

“All typhoons feed off the warm ocean waters,” he said. The moisture-laden air above these regions is the fuel that fires the engines in these storms.

“We’ve seen in the past decades the oceans are warming up, likely due to climate change,” said Price. “So warmer oceans will give us more energy for these storms, likely resulting in more intense storms.”

Read the complete article here.

In the news: Typhoon Haiyan: Thousands feared dead in Philippines

Photos via BBC
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