If only she’s in my neighborhood…

Sounds very familiar. Some excerpts from TIME.com

Superintendents, parents and teachers in urban school districts lament systemic problems they cannot control: poverty, hunger, violence and negligent parents. They bicker over small improvements such as class size and curriculum, like diplomats touring a refugee camp and talking about the need for nicer curtains. To the extent they intervene at all, politicians respond by either throwing more money at the problem (if they’re on the left) or making it easier for some parents to send their kids to private schools (if they’re on the right).

Meanwhile, millions of students left behind in confused classrooms spend another day learning nothing.

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Rhee is convinced that the answer to the U.S.’s education catastrophe is talent, in the form of outstanding teachers and principals. She wants to make Washington teachers the highest paid in the country, and in exchange she wants to get rid of the weakest teachers. Where she and the teachers’ union disagree most is on her ability to measure the quality of teachers.

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After Rhee graduated from Cornell University in 1992, she joined Teach for America. She spent three years teaching at Harlem Park Elementary, one of the lowest-performing schools in Baltimore. Her parents visited and were stunned by the conditions of the neighborhood. “The area where the kids lived reminded me of a scene after the Korean War,” says her father Shang Rhee.

Rhee suffered during that first year, and so did her students. She could not control the class. Her father remembers her returning home to visit and telling him she didn’t want to go back. She had hives on her face from the stress.

The second year, Rhee got better. She and another teacher started out with second-graders who were scoring in the bottom percentile on standardized tests. They held on to those kids for two years, and by the end of third grade, the majority were at or above grade level, she says. (Baltimore does not have good test data going back that far, a problem that plagues many districts, so this assertion cannot be checked. But Rhee’s principal at the time has confirmed the claim.) The experience gave Rhee faith in the power of good teaching. Yet what happened afterward broke her heart. “What was most disappointing was to watch these kids go off into the fourth grade and just lose everything,” Rhee says, “because they were in classrooms with teachers who weren’t engaging them.”

Ano ba ang katumbas ng chancellor dito, regional director? Kapag nagkaro’n ng regional director na katulad ni Michelle Rhee dito, ini-imagine ko na ang mangyayari..

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